Overview

Attorney J Nelson Happy is a graduate of Columbia Law School and a former partner in two top Midwest law firms. He has achieved the highest rating for legal ability in Martindale-Hubbell and is a former tenured professor of law and former Dean of Regent University School of Law.

Mr. Happy is a seasoned trial litigator with over 53 years of legal experience. He has provided advice to scores of public and private corporate clients on a wide variety of legal issues including labor and employment, securities, contracts, negotiations, financing, environmental regulations, risk management and aviation law, product liability, insurance law, mergers, and acquisitions. He has successfully prosecuted and defended many tort and commercial litigation matters. He has briefed and argued cases in the 8th Circuit and 2nd Circuit Courts of Appeal; Supreme Court of Virginia; Supreme Court of Missouri; Supreme Court of North Carolina; North Carolina Court of Appeals; and the Supreme Court of Kansas.

Mr. Happy has represented Pro Bono clients in criminal cases in Missouri and Virginia federal and state courts, and in various administrative matters including tenant’s rights and other entitlements. Mr. Happy is said to be the only lawyer who has argued and won two unrelated cases in the Virginia Supreme Court in one day.

Mr. Happy has appeared on television shows about legal issues, including Oprah Winfrey and Nightline.

Representative Experience

  • Damnum Absque Injuria, When Private Property Can Be Damaged Without Compensation, 36 Mo L Rev, 453.
  • Hughes v. Cole, 251 Va.3; 465 SE2d 820 (1996).

Professional & Community Activities

  • Dean and Professor of Law, Regent University School of Law, 1993–1999
  • Member, Virginia Continuing Legal Education Board (Appointed by the Supreme Court of Virginia), 1994–2000
  • Advisor, Virginia Board of Law Examiners, 1993–1999

Professional Recognition

  • Lawrence S. Greenbaum Prize, 1966
  • Columbia Law School Service Award, 1967

Further information on methodologies is available via these links.

Representative Experience

  • Damnum Absque Injuria, When Private Property Can Be Damaged Without Compensation, 36 Mo L Rev, 453.
  • Hughes v. Cole, 251 Va.3; 465 SE2d 820 (1996).